My Miracle

If you have been following my blog all these years, you will know that I’m not exactly a kid lover. Unlike some of my friends who go child crazy whenever they see one, I don’t. In fact, I try to keep my distance from them. 

I was mightily happy with being able to take off whenever and wherever I wanted to.  I wasn’t a bad person, just very self-centered. (There! I’ve said it! I hear some sniggers! 😡 you are supposed to disagree!)
Until one fine day…. I had a bee in my bonnet and decided that, “ok, perhaps it’s time to have a child.” Waaa! A lot of people bought 4D that day…

And she came along… On this very day, 6 years ago. 17 September 2009.

when 宝贝 was a few months’ old

She was a textbook baby! Easy going, good temper, gobbled up everything, slept on the dot. Good fortune I have!! I must have done a lot of good deeds to deserve her!! 

It was the best decision in my life, to have her. Being a parent has made me a better person. I used to feel very strongly against some issues but they now seem minute and petty. I think twice now if I want to do something bad (looks around furtively). Even if no one knew that I did it, but I know it and with that, I would have lost the right to teach my child the right thing to do if I can’t even do what I preach. 

at 1 year old

I also found that I could give up a lot of things for her. And I never knew that I was the self sacrificial kind. But hey! Maybe I had it in me all along! 😜 

at 2 years old


I used to love working so much that I spent 14 hours at work a day. Madness!!! Now I can’t wait to spend 14 hours with her!

at 3 years old

All my priorities have shifted. Money doesn’t seem as important anymore. Heck! I was even cutting back on work to spend time with her. I started reading parenting books, cooking books, any book that had to do with her. I even started cooking!! It’s a wonder that I haven’t poisoned all of us yet. (My Home Econs teacher must have been praying for me all these years after I almost poisoned her during food tasting in class. That’s another story altogether.)

at 4 years old

She’s the total opposite of me; she’s whatever I’m not. Sweet, sensitive, empathetic and utterly devoted to all of us.  I’ve been constantly reminded of that by my friends and colleagues. (you know who you are!) (although I’m sure I’ve those qualities, waiting to be discovered).  


at 5 years old

She’s been the best little helper since her
brother arrived. The ever devoted sister and self designated teacher to her little brother. 


Today she’s 6 years old. And I love her to bits!!

Happy 6th birthday my darling 宝贝!I don’t know where I’ll be if you haven’t appeared. You are my miracle. 


LKY once said : 

“And even from my sickbed, even if you are going to lower me into the grave and I feel that something is going wrong, I will get up.”

It’s real!!! AH KONG is with us tonight!

We should engrave this on the steps of the Parliament House!! Like how they have engraved Martin Luther King’s quote on the step of Washington’s memorial. 
AH KONG you are always here with us! 

Cooling Day 2015

Cooling day (Hazy day, more likely…), a day when all parties stop campaigning so that voters like you and me can focus on making the all important decision tomorrow. So I spent today going through the youtube videos of the candidates, weighing the merits of each candidate… hmm.. who should I pick?  Besides deciding on who to vote for, these went through my mind :

1. Qualified female candidates

I’m very heartened to see more young, female qualified candidates stepping into the political arena, namely in the PAP and WP. (Sorry guys, I simply can’t bring myself to name the NSP candidate. ) Females are badly represented in the parliament and yet we make up 50% (or more?) of the population. There are issues that I would like to see them bring up in Parliament – more benefits for single moms, work-life balance for working moms etc. And who knows, maybe we will have a female PM one day!

2. More qualified candidates in the opposition parties

Let’s put it this way… there are some people out there who will vote for the opposition parties (even if they vote a monkey in), just to show their displeasure for the incumbent party.  So I’d rather see a qualified MP, making coherent, constructive arguments in Parliament, than a screeching, senseless primate, waving his fingers around, trying to decide who to point to, himself or others.. and BOO! (Sorry… I just couldn’t resist that.)(By the way, if you don’t know what I’m writing about, it means that you haven’t watched enough youtube rally videos!)

These opposition candidates have shown some common sense and have the ability to connect with the ground.

3. Candidates should write their own speeches.

I have always felt that candidates should write their own speeches.  Well, Mr. LKY did, with some vetting help from Mrs. Lee.  That’s why he was always able to speak with passion in a natural manner and hardly looking at his script. There’s no way another person can duplicate a person’s train of thought and when the speech wasn’t written by the candidate himself/herself, it was really obvious. There were people who practically read off the script (eh, where’s the eye contact?!), or even pronounce the words wrongly (*face palm* that’s why must write own speech lah… so that you don’t put in words with 3 or more syllabus to trip yourself up) or deliver the speech in a monotonous manner. It was excruciatingly painful to watch them.

The speech writer may also have written the speech in a style, that’s not natural to the speaker, thus the speaker comes across being very “plastic” and not natural at all.  I’m not surprised, after all, someone else is putting words into their mouths.

4. Rabid supporters

Yes, you have read correctly. Rabid supporters! They exist in every form and in every party.  When they hear something that differs from their opinions, their eyes go bloodshot, they start to foam in their mouths, then they spew curses incoherently, even if it’s a family member.  Afterall, during election time, it’s “6 levels of family also no count” (六亲不认).  Sometimes, they go back to their normal selves after election is over, sometimes they don’t.  *shrug*

Actually, I’m rather glad that they exist.  Because of their existence, normal people like you and me appear slightly more intelligent lah… *blush* It’s all about relativity leh…

5. The GRC system

I don’t like the GRC system.  I believe that every candidate should be voted in, based on their own merits.  It’s up to the voter to decide if they want to vote for them because of the individual or the party that they represent. It’s because of the GRC system, that talented and hardworking politicians like George Yeo were voted out.  It’s a huge loss to the country.  It’s so difficult to get talented people who are public spirited into parliament!

They must take all the shit from people out there leh! Even carrying a Coach bag also will kana say – why is this person so showy, cannot carry plastic bag meh?! Even carry plastic bag also will kana say – why this person so not environmentally friendly wan?! Take bus, people say wayang. Take car, people say contribute to jam. Even their wives and children also kana say… so poor things… ok ok, i digress…

Not all the candidates fielded by the incumbent party are pulling their weights in the Parliament.  Let’s face it… it’s extremely difficult to recruit good people.  I have very talented friends who rolled their eyes at me, when I asked them if they would enter politics one day.. They said, “Siao ah! Not say get a lot more pay! In fact, take pay cut!!! Everyday kana scolding! I have better things to do! See… George Yeo so happy now! Every day can post photos on facebook of his travels! Who wants to be a MP?!”

It also works both ways.  The opposition parties have some really good people, but there are some dubious characters in the same GRC team, so they don’t get voted in. It’s such a pity.

So I’m in favour for the creation of more SMCs so that every candidate is judged based on his/her own merits. Afterall, every constituency has an MP-in-charged. If he has worked hard for the people, they will naturally vote for him. Although, I haven’t seen my MP (except on the campaign posters), but I admit that it’s my own fault as I’m too anti-social to take part in the organised activities and I’m blessed enough that I don’t need to seek his help. So I have no grounds for complaints!!

6. Connecting with the voters

This is something that I feel that the incumbent party should improve on. Many of the candidates, especially the new ones (or even 1-2 election old ones) can’t speak in a manner that connects with the voters.  They are probably not skilled in public speaking and are experiencing… stage fright?? But heck, you are going to be a politician! Politicians need to make speeches, address the people and speak up for the people in Parliament!  That’s why they are being accused of being aloof and elitist.  They should be trained on public speaking! And… cannot always speak in the Queen’s english lah! Like that, how can the ordinary people like us connect with you? Must smile at us, look at us when you talk.  Must speak a smattering of Singlish, hokkien, teochew!  But there must be a balance… cannot “chut pattern” excessively, or else, people will accuse you of trying too hard. This is what many of the opposition candidates are able to do very well. Ka Ki Nang!!

Anyway, it will be polling day in a few hours.  Whether you are voting for white, blue, red, yellow, green, rainbow, we are all Singaporeans and we want the country we love to prosper and our countrymen to lead happy lives.  And so… we trudge on… Majulah Singapura!!

It was with pride as I took in the beautiful night view of our skyline. We have indeed come a long way. It’s by no mean feat that we have turned 50 and we can’t rest on our laurels if we want to celebrate SG100. 

Once upon a time, I used to cringe when I heard Singlish. After living in Germany for a year, listening to German or German accented English every single day, I was actually delighted when I caught Singlish being spoken in a foreign country. Ah! My fellow countrymen, I beamed. The familiarity and the longing (to my surprise) for this unique language made me want to go home. 

I knew, at that moment, that there’s no other place that I would call home. It’s through living in other countries that I realized how lucky I was, to be born a Singaporean. Sure, it’s not perfect, but it’s home. 

The National Day Message which was read by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, summed up the hardships and struggles our forefathers have been through. It totally resonates with me. Thank you our forefathers and I’ll endeavor to forge on and aspire to make a difference in the lives of the people around me. 

A reminder to myself, lest I forget. Here’s the transcript of PM Lee’s National Day Message 2015. 

National Day Message 2015

My Fellow Singaporeans

50 years ago, on this very night, Singapore was on the eve of a momentous change. The Cabinet had already signed the Separation Agreement. The Government Printers were busy printing the Separation Agreement and the Proclamation of Independence in a special Government Gazette. The Commissioner of Police and the Commander of the army units had been told by the Malaysian Government to take orders from the new government the next day. But all this happened in strict secrecy. Our forefathers went to bed oblivious of what was about to happen, still for the time being citizens of Malaysia.

Then morning came. The 9th of August 1965. Our world changed. At 10 a.m., a radio announcer read the Proclamation. Singapore had left Malaysia and would “forever be a sovereign, democratic and independent nation”. The Republic of Singapore was born.
People were apprehensive. No one knew if we could make it on our own. Our economy was not yet viable, much less vibrant. We had practically no resources, and no independent armed forces. Around noon on that first day, Mr Lee Kuan Yew gave a press conference on TV. He broke down halfway, unable to contain his emotions. It was, he said, “a moment of anguish”.

But that moment of anguish turned into a lifetime of determination to forge a path for this island nation. At the end of the press conference, Mr Lee made a promise to Singaporeans. He said: “We are going to be a multi-racial nation in Singapore. We will set an example. This is not a Malay nation; this is not a Chinese nation; this is not an Indian nation. Everyone will have his place, equal: language, culture, religion.”

From that break, we began building a nation. And what a journey it has been. It started with the first generation of leaders convincing our pioneer generation that Singapore could succeed as a sovereign country. Together, leaders and the people – the lions and the lion-hearted – fought with unwavering determination to secure our foundations. After them, younger generations picked up the baton and took Singapore further.

Year after year, Singapore progressed. Along the way we overcame many problems – the British withdrawal in 1971, the Oil Crisis in 1973, SARS, the Asian Financial Crisis, and then the Global Financial Crisis. We grew our economy and created jobs, built homes, schools, hospitals and parks. We built a nation.

Year after year, we have kept the promises that Mr Lee Kuan Yew made on the 9th of August 1965: that we will be “one united people, regardless of race, language or religion”; that we will always have a bright future ahead of us.

Therefore on our 50th birthday, we have ample reason to celebrate.

Let us celebrate 50 years of peace and security, underwritten by the blood and sweat of generations of NSmen.

Let us celebrate how we turned vulnerabilities into strengths. How a struggling economy with no domestic market made the world our market and created jobs for our people. How without any domestic hinterland, we made PSA and Changi Airport the best in the world. How from being utterly dependent on Johor for water, we turned the whole island into one catchment area, and developed NEWater. 

How while we had no natural resources, we educated every Singaporean and created opportunities for their talents to thrive. We have proven that together, we are greater than the sum of our parts.

Most of all let us celebrate how we journeyed from Third World to First, as one united people, leaving no one behind. Every citizen has benefitted from Singapore’s progress. Life has improved for all – for Chinese, Malays, Indians and Eurasians; for blue collar as well as white collar workers; for HDB as well as condominium dwellers. We are a nation of home owners. Everyone has opportunities to improve themselves. Everyone can look forward to a brighter future.

At 50 years, as we stand at a high base camp, we look back and marvel how far we have come. We are grateful to those who made it happen.

From this base camp, we can also look forward to new peaks ahead. The journey ahead is uncharted. But we must press on, because we aspire to do better for ourselves and our children.

We know that we will get there, because we will always be there for one another. We are stronger as one people. For example, we instinctively gather to lift a truck to save someone trapped underneath. Even if the music fails, we go on singing the National Anthem with gusto. We are proud of our past and confident of our future. Together we believe in Singapore; together we belong to Singapore; together, we are Singapore.

I am speaking to you from Victoria Concert Hall, a place that holds special significance in Singapore’s history. In 1954, this was called the Victoria Memorial Hall. It was here that Mr Lee Kuan Yew launched the People’s Action Party, and inaugurated the long struggle for a fair and just society. It was here in 1958 that “Majulah Singapura” was first performed. It was at the Padang nearby, after independence, that we held our National Day Parades, and sang “Majulah Singapura” together as a nation.

50 years on, on our Golden Jubilee, we will gather again at the Padang. We will sing “Majulah Singapura” proudly, and recite the National Pledge. We will rejoice in the success of our last five decades, and commit ourselves anew to work together as one united people, regardless of race, language or religion, to build Singapore, so as to achieve happiness, prosperity, and progress for our nation.

Happy 50th National Day!

It all started because of this. 

  Me : Let’s chat! How’s your day?
宝贝 : Mommy, I’d like to finish reading my book first. (In a sternly reprimanding tone)

Gosh… For a while, I felt like I was the wayward daughter. 😓

Sigh…! With the no gadget rule, I had nothing to occupy myself with. I had to resort to eavesdropping on the conversation at the next table. Well, not exactly eavesdropping because they were rather loud and expressive. 

Son (probably in secondary school) : What’s this in the jug?

Mother : That is the salad sauce to go with your salad. 

Son : Can I drink it?

Mother : Don’t be STUPID!! That’s for your salad. 

By the way, the poor woman is surrounded by stupid people and things, namely her stupid phone, her stupid husband, her stupid son etc. And she announced to the whole restaurant about them. My heart goes out to her. I can’t imagine myself surrounded by so much stupidity…
Son : Ok!!

I imagined if I were her, I would probably tell him, “Yes! Drink it! Make sure you finish the entire jug!”

Oh well, that’s just me. 

Ok, you are right… I was indeed, very bored…. 😂😂😂

It was a shocking news that rippled through my Secondary school’s whatsapp groups. First, it was the shock.  When the shock had passed, questions surfaced. But then, no one knew the answer.  Anyway, the answer was inconsequential, because it didn’t matter anymore. I have not seen her since we left school.

In my memory, she was a warm and friendly person.  She always wore a smile on her face and was ever approachable to all. She always had something nice to say to everyone. Her results were superb and I assume that she was also extremely capable at work because she was holding a c-level post at a renowned medical institution. She was only 40 when she passed on, leaving behind a 9 year old child. Many people were grieving for her because she was such a warm and loving person.

She was one of the few people who have passed away in their prime.  It was always unexpected. I guess they didn’t expect that themselves either.

It’s always these shocking events that make me drop everything that I was doing, take a break from my ever hectic schedule (this is self-inflicted), to ponder over what I have achieved and what I really want to attain.

Life is too short :

To be doing things that don’t make me happy.

To be spent on undeserving people who are ungrateful.

To be complaining about every single things that doesn’t go my way.

To be pandering to the whims of people who don’t matter to me.

To be wasted on fighting over little things with petty people.

It’s time :

To say no to things that don’t bring me joy.

To be with my loved ones and people who matter to me, especially my grandmother and parents who are getting on in years.

To ignore nincompoops and beasts.

To fulfill my bucket list.

To indulge in some self pampering.

It’s time to live every single day as though it’s my last. Live life with no regrets!

Rest in Peace, my friend.

All it took was a slippery ground after water play and the metal floor track of the sliding door. Humpty Didi slipped and landed his shin on the metal track. 

He said that he cried “not very loudly” and no one paid him any attention so he picked himself up and limped into the classroom. 

My heart went out to him when I heard it. The teachers probably didn’t think much of it since he didn’t bawl his eyes out. But he was unable to rest his weight on his left leg. 

I googled his condition online and read that there’s a possibility of toddler fracture (hairline fracture). 

Still as cheeky as ever. 

Ming Ming : Caroline’s 奶奶 (grandmother) said I’m buat Toh (with an English slang). But, Mommy, I’m not Buat Toh. I’m Cheng Ming!! (Indignantly)

*Buat Toh is hokkien for fall down. 


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 501 other followers